Car seating and the adjustment of car seats can affect you and your back, especially if you spend a lot of time in your car.

When else would you sit in a chair and not move your spine or pelvis for literally hours at a time? The only nearest comparison, would be to watch a very long film at a cinema. In all other situations you get up, go and get a cup of tea/ coffee, go to the toilet, stand and have a chat to someone. so driving is not an activity to be underestimated in terms of your spinal and postural health!

Here are some tips on driving and the best ways to reduce the risk of probelms arising.

If you regularly get backache when driving you should probably get an osteopathic assessment.

1. Break up your journeys

Stop for comfort breaks every hour, even if you don't think you need to. just a short walk to and from your car to the toilets on a motorway will give your back muscles a chance to recover form the sitting posture. If not on motorways do make little stops at the sides of some roads and have a few minutes walk.

This may add say 10 minutes to your journey - in reality making very little time difference, but the difference in how you will feel on arrival is considerable. You will feel mentally and physically fresher and if travelling on business the difference could be vital to the success of your meeting.

2. Make sure you are not tired

When you are tired and fatigued you are at greater risk when driving from an accident perspective, but you also at greater risk regarding your back. When we are tired we are less conscious of any tensions building up in our spine and muscles.

3. Make sure your seat is adjusted properly (click for article on correct seat adjustment). Most people do not have their car seat adjusted properly. Little information is ever given on how to do it and that that is available is based on Mr/Ms Average (who do not exist). If you follow the advice in the Seat Adjustment article then you will learn how to set upi your car seat specifically for your spine.